​S​ex orgies, prostitution and porn videos shake Catholic Church in Italy

Church in Italy and Sex

By Josephine McKenna  in Religion News Service

James Kottor(Note: If some thought priestly celibacy was practiced by all everywhere in the Catholic Church ever since its introduction, they are sadly mistaken. It was observed  more in its breach than in its practice by many, just because  it was introduced more for vested interests of the Church administration of the times – financial gains — than for theological or scriptural reasons. Celibacy was not and is not a  sine-qua-non for the exercise of priestly duties.

With the arrival of Pope Francis things have become more transparent and forbidden things are more openly discussed. Teachings of John Paul II and Benedict could not be questioned. Their Synods were occasions to express Episcopal loyalty to the Pope, not forums for open discussion. Theologians who crossed the red line were silenced. Francis does nothing of the kind to a Cardinal Burke or those who question his teachings. For Francis what is important is orthopraxis (how one lives the faith) than orthodoxies (how one explains the faith). Irish saint Malachy, the 12th century bishop of Armagh predicted there will be only one more pope after Benedict. Francis the  266th  pope. There was much talk about it when he was elected. So are some fighting factions going to write the epitaph of Papacy ? or a church without a Pope?

Report below shows how celibacy is observed in Italy. Earlier we had even published reports of posh Red Light  mansions (only they  don’t call them streets) and massage parlours frequented by the clergy. Such abuses will continue or even increase until celibacy is made   optional to  clean up the Aegean stables, whether in India or abroad. This is no argument that Celibacy will vanish from the Catholic Church. No, never! Optional celibacy will continue to shine as a heavenly spiritual star both within the priesthood and outside for the sake of total dedication for serving and caring for the oppressed, suppressed and marginalized, which is what evangelization is about as practiced and taught by Jesus.  james kottoor, editor)

ROME (RNS) Lurid accusations of priests involved in sex orgies, porn videos and prostitution have emerged from several parishes in Italy recently, sending shock waves all the way to the Vatican and challenging the high standards that Pope Francis has demanded of clergy.

In the southern city of Naples, for example, a priest was recently suspended from the parish of Santa Maria degli Angeli over claims he held gay orgies and used internet sites to recruit potential partners whom he paid for sex. The allegations concerning the Rev. Mario D’Orlando were brought to the attention of the diocese when an anonymous letter was sent to a Naples bishop. D’Orlando denied the charges when he was summoned by the city’s archbishop, Cardinal Crescenzio Sepe, but is now facing a formal inquiry conducted by local church officials.

“He has been removed from his position while the investigation is underway,” a spokesman for the cardinal told Religion News Service. “I have no further comment.” In the northern city of Padua, a 48-year-old priest, the Rev. Andrea Contin, is facing defrocking as well as judicial proceedings amid accusations he had up to 30 lovers, some of whom he took to a swingers’ resort in France.

Contin was removed from his parish of San Lazzaro after three women came forward with complaints against him last December. Bishop Claudio Cipolla of Padua cut short a visit to Latin America to deal with the scandal. “I am incredulous and pained by the accusations,” Cipolla told a news conference last month. “This is unacceptable behavior for a priest, a Christian and even for a man.”

One woman, who claims to have been Contin’s lover for more than three years, claimed the priest carried sex toys and bondage equipment, prostituted his lovers on wife-swapping websites and also invited other priests from the area to sex parties. “Even if, at the end of this affair, there are no legal consequences, we have a duty by canon law to take disciplinary action,” said Cipolla.

He also revealed Pope Francis had telephoned him personally at the end of January to offer his support and urge him to stay “strong.” Since his election the pope has taken a tough line on ethical behavior in the church though he has also recognized the reality of human imperfection and personal flaws.

In recent weeks he has spoken out many times against “temptation,” and last week he told a gathering of clergy at the Basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome that faith could not progress without the challenge of temptation.“Temptation is always present in our lives. Moreover, without temptation you cannot progress in faith,” he said.

Alberto Melloni, professor of church history at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, said there is nothing unusual about scandals in the priesthood. “There is no sin that a cleric doesn’t commit. Scandals to me seem quite normal,” he told RNS." And I think the illusion of stopping scandals through better selection of personnel is not very promising and has not yielded great results. ”

Francis has frequently called for a more rigorous screening process for seminarians, and he has taken direct action when scandals erupt in Italy. A case in point: When reports of “playboy priests” surfaced in the Italian diocese of Albenga-Imperia in the northern region of Liguria in late 2014, the pope sent a special envoy to investigate claims that clerics had posted nude photos of themselves on gay websites, sexually harassed the faithful and stolen church funds.

Two years later the pope replaced the leader of the diocese, Bishop Mario Oliveri. Austen Ivereigh, commentator and author of “The Great Reformer: Francis and the Making of a Radical Pope,” said the pope distinguished between sinfulness and corruption and was intent on “rooting out” corruption inside the church. “The remedy for those who succumb to temptation is forgiveness and a fresh start,” Ivereigh told RNS. “The problem is when priests turn their backs on the people, lead hidden lives and end up justifying their conduct. That’s corruption.“And it’s only possible in the priesthood because of clericalism. That’s why the pope is so intent on rooting it out.”(Josephine McKenna has more than 30 years' experience in print, broadcast and interactive media. Based in Rome since 2007, she covered the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI and election of Pope Francis and canonizations of their predecessors. Now she covers all things Vatican for RNS).

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