Pope Francis, gift of the Spirit, says Salesian General

RM-interview

Kolkata (CM Paul – Matters India)– Having spent three days with some 1,900 members of South Asia Salesian Family gathered for Congress to mark the bicentenary of Don Bosco’s birth, the 10th successor of Don Bosco reflected on the significance of his maiden visit to India, and especially to Kolkata.

Eleven groups of the Salesian family in South Asia – Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Sri Lanka studied and deliberated upon the congress theme “One family, one mission” and published a joint statement.

The final statement of the congress denotes the fundamental direction for the Salesians of Don Bosco to live in deep interiority and love for Jesus, and to work for the poorest of the poor among young people.

“I have not been able to see much of the Salesian works in Kolkata, but my first impression is great. I am amazed by the affection of people in the congress who have manifested great desire to serve the church and the Salesian family,” said the Rector Major summing up his first impressions of his maiden visit to India.

“I like very much the style of pope Francis – a totally evangelical and prophetic role lived in simplicity and with pastoral radicalism,” said Rector Major commenting on his youth ministry days in Buenos Aires in Argentina with archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the current pope.

Pope Francis is indeed “The gift of the Spirit for our times,” said the Rector Major commenting upon pope’s visit to Cuba and USA last week.

Rector Major called on Saleisans to be experts in humanity and for the cause of young people,” insisting that the expertise should not remain just academic or at the level of mere university syllabus.

Rector Major also underlined the Salesian Family charism “of being always for the church, with the church and collaborating [with others] to build a church we are proud of.”

On 29th September morning Rector Major left for New Delhi to participate at the Salesian youth events marking the conclusion of Don Bosco birth bi-centenary.

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