Donald Trump is uniquely unfit to be president – Paul Thornton,

Trump

 in  Los Angels Times, March 5/16                    

(Note:   “ Trump has shamefully little knowledge of the issues facing the country and the world, and James Kottora temperament utterly unsuited to the job. He is a racist and a bully, a demagogue. He has proposed killing the families of terrorists, a violation of international law so blatant that a former CIA director predicted that U.S. troops would refuse to carry out such an order”, says LA columnist.  What do you readers say? James kottoor, editor)

Good morning. I'm Paul Thornton, The Times' letters editor, and it is Saturday, March 5. For readers in Southern California, here's a friendly reminder to shut off your sprinklers this weekend. Now, let's turn our attention to another force of nature.

The Times' editorial board hasn't exactly been unsparing in its praise for Donald Trump. After Ted Cruz won the Iowa caucus on Feb. 1, an editorial thanked the Texas senator for doing the country a favor by defeating Trump. In December, after Trump called for a "total and complete shutdown" of Muslim immigration to the United States, an editorial called his record of inflammatory statements a "giant soup of bigotry and intolerance." 

But for readers who still wonder, "Hey, what does The Times' editorial boardreally think about Donald Trump?," here's an answer: "Donald Trump is not fit to be president of the United States."More from the editorial:

He has shamefully little knowledge of the issues facing the country and the world, and a temperament utterly unsuited to the job. He is a racist and a bully, a demagogue. He has proposed killing the families of terrorists, a violation of international law so blatant that a former CIA director predicted that U.S. troops would refuse to carry out such an order.
He mocked a disabled person at a campaign rally. He has vowed to reinstate waterboarding and forms of torture that are "much worse." He intends to seize and deport 11 million people living in the U.S. illegally. He would bar all Muslims from entering the country until further notice. He would "open up our libel laws" so that news organizations are punished for writing critical "hit" pieces. He wants to build a wall along the entire Mexican border, on the fantastical premise that he could force the Mexican government to pay for it. He has threatened to start trade wars with two of the country's biggest trading partners, Mexico and China, by slapping on the kind of protectionist tariffs that U.S. leaders have been trying for decades to eliminate worldwide.
Often enough he says nothing at all, promising to replace Obamacare, for instance, with "something great" or assuring listeners vaguely that a winner such as himself — someone who never tires of telling the world he's rich, successful and famous — will make it all work out one way or another.

It isn't easy to tell how much of Trump's performance is merely shtick and how much is real. In the aftermath of his victories Tuesday, Trump struck a less adversarial tone and talked about how he was "becoming diplomatic."  Yet at the same time, he said this of House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), one of several GOP leaders who suggested Trump hadn't disavowed an endorsement by former KKK leader David Duke forcefully enough: "Paul Ryan, I don't know him well, but I’m sure I’m going to get along great with him. And if I don't, he's going to have to pay a big price, OK?" That's about as diplomatic a message as a dead fish wrapped in newspaper.We hope we won't have to learn who the real Donald J. Trump might be.

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